The Jennifer Campbell Show
LATEST EPISODES
Wednesday September 20th, 2017 - 9am
TOPIC: "I was free": An Ontario woman flees her Mennonite home in the middle of the night GUEST: Emma Drummond https://www.waterloochronicle.ca/news-story/7555592--i-was-free-an-ontario-woman-flees-her-mennonite-home-in-the-middle-of-the-night/
TOPIC: Danby CEO Jim Estill recognized as global hero for sponsoring Syrian families GUEST: Jim Estill, CEO Danby Jim Estill of Guelph is receiving an international award for his humanitarian work to sponsor 58 Syrian families. Estill, the CEO of Danby, is one of 10 people receiving the Global Hope Coalition award Hero in the Global Campaign Against Extremism and Intolerance. "I'm very honoured, and I guess in a sense, I'm blown away by the company that I'll be keeping tonight," Estill said before boarding a plane to New York City where he would attend the awards ceremony Monday night. Also in attendance at the ceremony, held at the New York Public Library, will be former first lady Laura Bush, former British prime minister Tony Blair, French President Emmanuel Macron and the President of Malta, Marie-Louise Coleiro Preca. "I'm honoured and humbled and I hope that other people can be inspired," Estill told CBC Kitchener-Waterloo Monday. The Global Hope Coalition is a network of three not-for-profit foundations in New York, Zurich and Hong Kong. The group's website says the coalition's goal is to recognize people who "take great risks every day to accomplish their mission" and also to "empower courageous individuals who stand up to terror and violence, preserve our cultural heritage and build bridges across cultures." http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/kitchener-waterloo/jim-estill-danby-ceo-global-hope-coalition-award-syrian-1.4295135
Today at 12:00 PM
Tuesday September 17th, 2017 - 9am (Lisa Drew Fills In)
TOPIC: MADD Canada applauds provincial Liberal plans for drug-impaired drivers GUEST: Carolyn Swinson, Ontario Board Member http://www.570news.com/2017/09/19/madd-canada-applauds-provincial-liberal-plans-drug-impaired-drivers/
TOPIC: K-W campaign challenges community to buy local for a week GUEST: Sam Trieu, Organizer for Kitchener Waterloo http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/kitchener-waterloo/kitchener-waterloo-initiative-challenging-community-shop-local-1.4295359
TOPIC: Trailblazing - Women in Canada GUEST: Stacey MacLennan, Collections curator and registrar, Waterloo Region Museum http://www.waterlooregionmuseum.ca/en/exhibits/trailblazing---women-in-canada-since-1867.aspx?_mid_=17629#
TOPIC: Invictus Games Toronto GUEST: Michael Burns, CEO, Invictus Games Toronto 2017 http://www.torontosun.com/2017/09/16/harry-brings-spotlight-to-to-for-invictus-games
Sep 19, 2017, 12:00 PM
Monday September 18th, 2017 - 9am
TOPIC: No, Hillary Clinton should not ‘Shut Up and Go Away’ GUEST: Anne Kingston, MacLean’s http://www.macleans.ca/culture/books/no-hillary-clinton-should-not-shut-the-f-k-up-and-go-away/ How history will treat Hillary Clinton, we cannot know. But the fact so many people—across the political spectrum—want to silence her, to degrade her, to shove her off the public stage, offers a chilling snapshot of the here and now. “What’s to be done with Hillary Clinton, the woman who won’t go away?” fretted The New York Times. “Former Clinton Fundraiser Says Hillary Should ‘Shut The F–k Up And Go Away,’ ” the Daily Caller announced. Vanity Fair was only slightly more polite: “Can Hillary Clinton Please Go Quietly into the Night?” Even progressives’ progressive Bernie Sanders, promoting his new book on The Late Show with Stephen Colbert, urged the nation “to go forward, not backward,” when conversation turned to Clinton’s upcoming book. It’s “silly to rethink the 2016 election,” Sanders said. The barrage brings to mind two chestnuts: “Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it” and “déjà vu all over again.” It’s not been a year since an unqualified, undisciplined, misogynistic, serial liar was elected U.S. president. Donald Trump has diminished the nation’s standing internationally, abetted white supremacists, degraded the democratic process, tweeted threat of nuclear attack, and appears to have colluded with the Russian government. And yet somehow Hillary Clinton, regarded by many as the most qualified presidential candidate in U.S. history and a role model to generations of women, remains the nation’s paramount problem. Have these people learned nothing about false equivalencies? At a time civil liberties and women’s rights are under daily attack in the U.S., it’s worth remembering that democracies don’t erase history. Autocracies do. Clinton’s new book, What Happened, released Tuesday, has met with the polarized response that punctuated the ugliest, most riveting election campaign in American history. At 464 pages, it’s a workhorse—part memoir, part political post-mortem, part policy primer, part blueprint for the future. Lessons from 2016 can “help us heal our democracy and protect it in the future,” Clinton writes. What Happened presents the former political insider and policy wonk as outraged, concerned citizen. The Trump administration is a “full-on ideological assault on the legacy of the Great Society and of the New Deal,” Clinton writes; “there are times when all I want to do is scream into a pillow.” Throughout, she displays a wry humour unseen on the hustings. Trump gets no mercy; he “dreams of Moscow on the Potomac,” she writes at one point. The book begins with Clinton’s interior monologue during Trump’s inauguration. She debated going. When there, she fantasized about where she’d rather be: “Bali, maybe? Bali would be good.” She recalls sharing a rueful glance with Michelle Obama that read, “Can you believe this?” she writes. When Trump declared his intention to run in 2015, she thought it was a joke, having watched the businessman transition from “tabloid scoundrel to right-wing crank.” Then she watched him receive wall-to-wall media coverage: “The joke, it turned out, was on us.” Now-ominous foreshadowing was evident in a satirical video Clinton made for the 2006 New York State political correspondents’ dinner when she was a senator, she writes. In it, she posed as a wax figure, as well-known New Yorkers walked by commenting about her. One was Trump, who said: “You look really great. Unbelievable. The hair is magnificent. The face is beautiful. You know, I really think you should run for president.” When the camera panned back, viewers saw him looking into a mirror. “It was funny at the time,” Clinton reports. Losing came as a shock from which the author still appears to be reeling (she was so confident she’d win that she and her husband bought the house next door to their Chappaqua, N.Y., home to accommodate a president’s big team). Yoga, supportive friends and Broadway shows helped her through the darkest days: “I also drank my share of Chardonnay.” Clinton is clearly writing for history, using the platform to tell her version and correct the record—as well as the flagrant falsehoods that have taken grip. At times it feels like she’s still campaigning. She runs through her various policy positions—her economic plan, gun control, reproductive rights—that weren’t given fair airing, she says; she quotes a concerning stat from one Harvard study that found only 10 per cent of media coverage dealt with policy.
TOPIC: 35% of us in relationships are still regularly using dating apps http://metro.co.uk/2017/09/07/35-of-us-in-relationships-are-still-regularly-using-dating-apps-6909353/
TOPIC: Canada’s Dating Coach GUEST: Chantal Heide
Sep 18, 2017, 12:00 PM
Friday September 15th, 2017 - 9am
TOPIC: Cost of animal control jumps 48% GUEST: Bil Ioannidis, Ward 7 Councillor, City of Kitchener The city plans on entering into a new four-year contract with the humane society that would see the annual base cost jump by almost 50 per cent to $913,000. “In previous years, the contract that was negotiated … it was not adequate funding for them to continue performing the services,” according to the city’s director of bylaw enforcement, Gloria MacNeil. “Therefore, if we would like to maintain the current levels of services with them, this is what’s being proposed as the cost that’s required,” she told the city’s community services and infrastructure committee. The new contract is modelled differently than in the past as revenue from the dog licence program, administered by the humane society, hasn’t sustained operations as hoped. The city will be forgiving a $209,335 remittance for 2016. “I think it’s kind of getting sloughed by,” said Coun. John Gazzola, who questioned why the report and staff recommendation appeared as a motion of consent after a lengthy caucus discussion. “I appreciate and understand the reason for it, the necessity for it. I don’t like it, but I understand it. I’m just trying to make it clear for everybody to understand, to see where we’re going and why," he said.  “This problem has bothered us for the last 35, 40 years. It’s really a difficult thing to deal with.” A report last summer called on the city to cover a $137,000 shortfall in licensing revenue because attempts to inform and educate the public about the licensing program hadn’t translated to more sales. No one knows exactly how many dogs live in the City of Kitchener. Estimates are between 45,000 and 50,000, but according to city staff, only a small fraction — between 14,000 and 15,000 — are issued licences by the humane society. Moving forward, what they’ve done is asked the rate to be based on a per capita (humans) basis, which is in line with what other municipalities are doing,” MacNeil said. The new contract is structured to allow the humane society to retain dog licensing revenue over $445,000, if any, collected in 2018, which is intended to help fulfil its obligation to pay the city $209,000 of revenue collected in 2017, under the current contract. New contract terms also include a $10,000 per year licensing program augmentation fund to try new ideas and initiatives for growing the dog-licensing program. Coun. Frank Etherington wondered why cats aren’t licensed. “Considering all of the needs in this community, I’m horrified at this total cost to take care of animals, and I‘m not an animal hater,” he said. “I think it’s time we looked at this and brought it into some kind of balance.” Even though committee chair Coun. Bil Ioannidis ruled the question invalid, Etherington said he’ll ask the same question again at the next council meeting. But Coun. Scott Davey said there really isn’t much choice. “We either go with the deal we have here or we go with someone much more expensive, or we don’t look after the animals in our community,” he said. “Either we go with this contract or set up shop ourselves, and I don’t think we want to go that way,” said Ioannidis. “Overall, we’ve a good relationship with the humane society,” MacNeil said. “We haven’t had any issue in terms of service from them. “It just comes down to a compensation issue.” https://www.kitchenerpost.ca/news-story/7554181-cost-of-animal-control-jumps-48-/
TOPIC: 35% of us in relationships are still regularly using dating apps http://metro.co.uk/2017/09/07/35-of-us-in-relationships-are-still-regularly-using-dating-apps-6909353/
TOPIC: Kings & Queens of Country at St. Jacobs Country Playhouse GUEST: Alex Moustakas, Artistic Director, Drayton Entertainment In the tradition of the Grand Ole Opry, some of country music’s greatest pioneers are celebrated in this energetic, fun-filled musical revue: Johnny Cash, Hank Williams, Willie Nelson, Conway Twitty, Charley Pride, Merle Haggard, Kenny Rogers, Dolly Parton, Patsy Cline, Loretta Lynn, Tammy Wynette, and many, many more. Fusing elements of classic country, western, gospel, bluegrass – and a touch of comedy – Kings & Queens of Country is a jubilant walk down memory lane. So venture back to the honky-tonks and saloons which shaped country music’s glorious history, and get lost in the nostalgia of a simpler time. https://www.draytonentertainment.com/kings-queens-country
TOPIC: Social craze '3 AM Challenge' waking kids up at night for 'likes' Your child could be waking up in the middle of the night to film videos, even leaving the house, all while you sleep. It’s all thanks to the newest social media craze, called “The 3 AM Challenge,” and experts say it’s downright scary. Kids as young as kindergarteners are waking themselves up in the middle of the night and sneaking off, hoping to catch paranormal activity on camera. “That's really frightening as a parent,” said Debbie Breen, a licensed family counselor with South Charlotte Family Counseling. “3 a.m., the witching hour, that's just really dangerous for kids.” The goal of the challenge: wake up at 3 in the morning, catch something scary on video, then post it to YouTube. “This is just setting a dangerous precedent I think,” said Erik Goldfield, a licensed child counselor who specializes in the impact of social media. “The biggest role models now for teens and young people are YouTubers. These are who our kids are looking up to, and they're going to want to emulate that behavior.” Every night children are waking up, literally seeking out danger, all for ‘likes.’ “This is critical for parents,” Breen said. “You need to talk with your kids about it.” While the children may see a challenge that’s all in good fun, sneaking off in the middle of the night without mom and dad; that’s what real nightmares are made of. “Just because everybody else is allowing their kid to go wander the neighborhood at 3 a.m., be okay with saying no,” Goldfield said. “Say no, I’m going to put a stop to this.” http://www.wcnc.com/life/family/social-craze-3-am-challenge-waking-kids-up-at-night-for-likes/470227452
Sep 15, 2017, 12:00 PM
Thursday September 14th, 2017 - 9am
TOPIC: Weather Network forecasts mild, dry fall in store for most of Canada GUEST: Meterologist Tyler Hamilton, Weather Netowork One of Canada’s most high-profile forecasters is projecting comparatively mild temperatures and dry conditions for much of Canada this coming fall. The Weather Network says temperatures are expected to be near or above seasonal norms from coast to coast, with only momentary flashes of prospective winter conditions. Chief Meteorologist Chris Scott says the outlook is similar for precipitation. Most regions are on course to receive rainfall in line with seasonal averages. The one exception is the East Coast, which Scott says is likely to experience some fallout from an unusually active Atlantic hurricane season. The network says Canadians fresh from summer conditions that have deviated from the norm in many cases can now ease into a “quintessentially Canadian” autumn. “We think that this fall will have its share of ups and downs, as is normal, but there will be a few more ups than downs,” Scott said in a telephone interview. This especially holds true for those who prefer a dose of summer mixed in with transitional fall temperatures, Scott said, adding milder conditions are expected to prevail across most of the country. This will be particularly pronounced in Western Canada, which Scott said is just cooling down from an unusually warm past few months. He said fall temperatures are expected to exceed seasonal norms in British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, western Manitoba, the Yukon and the Northwest Territories. Areas further east, including Ontario and Quebec, have already experienced previews of fall weather in recent weeks thanks to some unseasonable dips in temperature, but Scott said those regions, too, will see overall warmer weather, forecasting an unusual number of pleasant days in October especially. Southwesterly air approaching the Atlantic provinces is expected to keep temperatures in check slightly above the normal range, Scott said, but added the area should brace for wetter conditions than the rest of the country. “We’ve had such a busy Atlantic hurricane season,” he said. “There may be some remnants of storms, or at least moisture from those storms, that gets pulled up and gives us above-normal precipitation for the next few months.” Central provinces will see close to average precipitation, with heavier individual rainfall balanced out by a higher proportion of rain-free, pleasant days, he said. Such conditions will come as a relief to stretches of Ontario and Quebec, which shivered through unseasonably cool and wet summer months. Scott said dry conditions that characterized the summer across the southern Prairies and southeast interior of British Columbia are expected to carry over into the autumn, with rainfall levels expected to be below seasonal averages. The B.C. coast, however, can expect typical rainfall patterns, which Scott said may come as a relief to an area ravaged by wildfires in recent months. Scott said winter conditions will likely settle in nationwide around mid-November, adding colder temperatures are expected to prevail across a large swath of the country for the latter part of the year. http://www.570news.com/2017/09/13/weather-network-forecasts-mild-dry-fall-in-store-for-most-of-canada/
TOPIC: Binge-watching as a couple is good for your relationship, study says https://www.dailydot.com/upstream/binge-watching-relationship-benefits-study/
TOPIC: Wynne denies in court that she offered NDP MP a job in her cabinet GUEST: Allison Jones, Legislative Reporter, The Canadian Press Ontario Premier Kathleen Wynne denied in court Wednesday that she promised a New Democrat MP a cabinet position to get him to leave his party and run for the provincial Liberals. The premier is a witness in the trial of two Liberals who are charged with bribery under the Election Act over allegations they offered a would-be candidate a job or appointment to get him to step aside for NDP MP Glenn Thibeault, who was Wynne’s preferred candidate in a 2015 byelection. Wynne herself is not facing charges and her lawyers sent Progressive Conservative Leader Patrick Brown a letter Wednesday demanding he retract comments they say suggest the premier is standing trial. Court heard that a man who let the premier’s staff know that Thibeault might be interested in switching parties relayed to them concerns he said Thibeault had “before jumping.” “Premier said he could only get in cabinet after a process and at next shuffle at a date TBD,” the man texted Pat Sorbara, the premier’s deputy chief of staff at the time and one of the two Liberals on trial. Sorbara and other top staff in the premier’s office wrote in a subsequent email chain that “demands for a cabinet position” were worrying. Wynne testified that the text doesn’t reflect her conversations with Thibeault. She prefers giving caucus members time to learn the system rather than immediately putting them in cabinet, she testified. “I made it clear to Glenn that that was my belief and that was my practice,” Wynne said, adding she first broached the cabinet issue and not Thibeault. “I actually put that forward because I wanted it to be very clear and I didn’t want there to be any misunderstanding about where I was coming from.” Thibeault, who was promoted to energy minister in June 2016, has previously denied he sought anything that would be seen as a bribe in exchange for running and is not charged with any offences. Sorbara, who was also Liberal campaign director, and Gerry Lougheed, a local Liberal organizer, have both pleaded not guilty. They’re accused of offering would-be candidate Andrew Olivier a job or appointment to get him to step aside for Thibeault. Wynne testified that when she, Lougheed and Sorbara each spoke to Olivier, she had decided Thibeault would be the candidate. She had hoped Olivier would step aside so Thibeault could win an uncontested nomination, in order to present a unified party, she said. The final decision and announcement of Thibeault’s appointment came a few days after those conversations, court heard, but Wynne said her mind was already made up. “It was very clear to (Olivier) I was prepared to go ahead and appoint, and that was the track that we were on,” she said. Olivier testified last week he still thought at that point he could change the premier’s mind and run in an open nomination contest. Olivier had been the Liberal candidate in Sudbury in the 2014 general election, but lost to the NDP. Wynne testified that she thought the Liberals should have held onto the riding, since they had held it for nearly two decades at that point. That led her to believe that Olivier was not as strong a candidate as she had thought and wouldn’t be the best candidate for a byelection, Wynne said. The seat became available when the New Democrat member resigned five months after the general election. When the premier heard that Thibeault was interested in running for the provincial Liberals she thought it was “an intriguing idea,” she said. Once Thibeault committed to running for the Liberals, Wynne said she left the next steps up to Sorbara. Sorbara is also facing a second charge, in relation to an allegation she arranged for paid jobs on the byelection campaign for two of Thibeault’s constituency staff, at his request. Wynne said she was aware Thibeault was concerned about what would happen with his staff. After testifying, Wynne spoke to reporters. “I wanted to be here to be as open as possible. I’ve said everything I came to say,” Wynne said. She did not take questions. The crowd chanted “Liar, liar, pants on fire” as she left. Although Wynne didn’t have to testify — she could have invoked parliamentary privilege — she announced earlier this year that she would be taking the stand. http://www.570news.com/2017/09/14/wynne-denies-court-offered-ndp-mp-job-cabinet/
TOPIC: Workers reveal the most ridiculous complaints they’ve dealt with Anyone who’s worked customer service will tell you it’s a thankless job, where they’re forced to deal with unreasonable customers and do it with a smile on their faces. As you can imagine, some customers will come up with some truly bizarre things to complain about and now folks are spilling the beans.
Sep 14, 2017, 12:00 PM
Wednesday September 13th, 2017 - 9am
TOPIC: Watchdog says more than 50,000 job cuts could result from minimum wage hike GUEST: David West, Chief Economist at the FAO More than 50,000 people could lose their jobs if the Ontario government goes ahead with its plan to raise the minimum wage to $15 an hour by 2019, the province's financial watchdog said Tuesday in a report that assessed the economic impact of the proposed increase. The job losses would be concentrated among teens and young adults, while the number of minimum wage workers in Ontario would increase from just over 500,000 to 1.6 million in 2019, the Financial Accountability Office said in its report. FAO chief economist David West said the province is entering “uncharted waters” with the increase because no other jurisdiction has gone so far so quickly. While the move will have a positive impact on the province's total labour market income - hiking it by 1.3 per cent - it will also result in job losses over a number of years. “There's evidence to suggest these job losses could be larger given the magnitude and rapid pace of this increase,” West said. In July, Premier Kathleen Wynne announced her government would increase the minimum wage to $15 an hour by Jan. 1, 2019. The increase would be phased in gradually and would rise with inflation, as scheduled, from $11.40 currently to $11.60 in October, to $14 an hour on Jan. 1, 2018 and $15 the following year. West said that while the FAO report makes no recommendations about the proposed policy, it does raise red flags for legislators. The report specifically sites the speed with which Ontario will phase in the change as a concern for business, he said. “It would be wrong to suggest that there won't be some employment impact,” he said. “Some businesses will certainly struggle to accommodate these higher payroll costs and will of course look at options for automation, and will look at hiring higher paid, higher productivity workers perhaps. But one way or the other, they're going to have to adjust.” The proposed changes are in response to a government-commissioned report released last week that included 173 recommendations addressing precarious work. The Changing Workplaces review concluded that new technology, a shrinking manufacturing sector and fewer union jobs, among other factors, have left approximately one-third of Ontario's 6.6 million workers vulnerable. Labour Minister Kevin Flynn said Tuesday that because of the province's strong economy the government can move forward with the minimum wage increase. He pointed to studies written in recent years by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, the Center for Economic and Policy Research and the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives that support the move. “This money (people are) going to be making goes right back into the economy,” Flynn said. “This doesn't go into trust funds or this doesn't go offshore. This goes right back to Main Street.” Asked how businesses could prepare, Flynn suggested they will have to find ways to absorb the increase. “Well, I think they could look at pricing, obviously that's one thing that obviously any business would do,” he said. Progressive Conservative Leader Patrick Brown said those comments can only mean one thing; the government expects businesses will pass on the wage increase to consumers. “It just shows how out of touch this government is,” Brown said. “They think you can just raise the prices on everything. Families are struggling right now to afford their hydro bills.” Brown said he supports the minimum wage increase but would like to see it phased in over a longer period of time. NDP leader Andrea Horwath said the Liberal government rushed its plan without helping prepare small business. If it had started this transition years ago it could have mitigated the impact, she said. “That's what happens when the Liberals do things for political purposes ... and (are) trying to get a bump in the polls,” she said. Groups representing both small and large businesses across Ontario have warned that the minimum wage increase would lead to layoffs. Karl Baldauf, spokesperson for the Keep Ontario Working Coalition, said that group conducted its own economic analysis of the minimum wage increase which concluded over 185,000 jobs could be impacted by the hike. The FAO report illustrates why the government should proceed with caution, he said. “(The government) needs to conduct an independent economic analysis and they need to adjust their plan depending upon what that analysis proves to them,” Baldauf said. http://www.cp24.com/news/watchdog-says-more-than-50-000-job-cuts-could-result-from-minimum-wage-hike-1.3585932?utm_source=dlvr.it&utm_medium=twitter
TOPIC: : Binge-watching as a couple is good for your relationship, study says Good news, binge-watchers! We potentially have one more reason for you to feel good about binge-watching TV with your significant other. A new study from the University of Aberdeen concluded that binge-watched shows effectively fills in for time the couple might spend together with mutual friends. If a couple doesn’t have many mutual friends, spending time binge-watching can compensate. Binge-watching a TV show can also bring couples together and make them feel closer. The results of two studies are included in the paper, each of which took place at a Northeastern university. One experiment took 259 students in exclusive relationships for an average of 16.7 months and examined their shared social relationships and their shared media use. They compared those numbers to their assessment of those relationships. The second study had 131 participants (later reduced to 128) in relationships averaging 19.22 months. The couples were asked about the number of friends they shared, had to write about experiences they shared and didn’t share. The study offered the conclusion that binge-watching with your partner was akin to other ways of meeting social needs, such as food, photos, and pets. https://www.dailydot.com/upstream/binge-watching-relationship-benefits-study/
TOPIC: Outfest KW 2017 GUEST: Patrick Masse GUEST: Drake Jensen OutFest celebrates LGBTQ+ stories through theatre, dance, and music. Drake Jensen and Patrick Masse are Canadian country singers from Ottawa, and Vancouver who are openly gay. They are in Kitchener to kick-off OutFest Wednesday evening (tomorrow) with our fundraiser. They will be performing some of their hits, and Drake will be sticking around until Saturday to for additional performances which will include local artist JoJo Worthington, and Ophelia Syndrome. www.page1.productions
Sep 13, 2017, 12:00 PM
Tuesday September 12th, 2017 - 9am
TOPIC: Engaged at 14: "I was worried about science class. And now I'm getting married?" GUEST: Sadia Rafiquddin http://www.cbc.ca/radio/docproject/features/engaged-at-14-i-was-worried-about-science-class-and-now-i-m-getting-married-1.4262086
TOPIC: Binge-watching as a couple is good for your relationship, study says Good news, binge-watchers! We potentially have one more reason for you to feel good about binge-watching TV with your significant other. A new study from the University of Aberdeen concluded that binge-watched shows effectively fills in for time the couple might spend together with mutual friends. If a couple doesn’t have many mutual friends, spending time binge-watching can compensate. Binge-watching a TV show can also bring couples together and make them feel closer. The results of two studies are included in the paper, each of which took place at a Northeastern university. One experiment took 259 students in exclusive relationships for an average of 16.7 months and examined their shared social relationships and their shared media use. They compared those numbers to their assessment of those relationships. The second study had 131 participants (later reduced to 128) in relationships averaging 19.22 months. The couples were asked about the number of friends they shared, had to write about experiences they shared and didn’t share. The study offered the conclusion that binge-watching with your partner was akin to other ways of meeting social needs, such as food, photos, and pets. https://www.dailydot.com/upstream/binge-watching-relationship-benefits-study/
TOPIC: Heckler at NDP Jagmeet Singh event demonstrates why minorities are deterred from politics, prof says GUEST: Erin Tolley, Associate Professor, University of Toronto Political Science department A political science professor says a racist heckler that interrupted a campaign rally for NDP leadership hopeful Jagmeet Singh is an example of the discrimination that deters minorities from politics. A video posted on YouTube of Singh’s campaign event in Brampton, Ont., earlier this week shows a woman interrupting his speech and accusing him of supporting Shariah law and the Muslim Brotherhood. Singh, who is Sikh, responds to the woman saying he supports and loves her, and that he won’t be intimidated by hate. “Everyone in this room loves you, we all support you, we believe in your rights,” he said as she continued yelling at him in front of a crowd of supporters. Erin Tolley, an associate professor at the University of Toronto, said the incident is a reminder that although Canada promotes multiculturalism, racist views are still prevalent. “I think one danger in Canada is we become very congratulatory about our multiculturalism ... but to some extent that conceals the number of Canadians that harbour racist sentiments,” she said. Tolley said studies have shown about 30 per cent of Canadians hold racist opinions and while they may not all be vocal about their views, it does influence how they vote. In her research on race and politics, she said discrimination against minorities, gender and people’s sexual orientation can give them pause about whether they want to enter or continue in politics. “I’m working on a study right now talking to people who had ran for the nomination of their party and many candidates of colour were somewhat surprised by what a negative experience it was, and so they are thinking twice about whether they want to continue,” she said. Singh’s ability to keep calm and respond in a positive manner to the heckler is evidence that it wasn’t the first time he experienced outwardly racist remarks, Tolley said. Although it was a negative incident, she said it did allow Singh to show off his leadership skills and raise his profile across the country. “He shows he’s not an angry person, he can keep his wits about him, he isn’t going to lose his cool and, politically, regardless of the situation, that’s seen as advantageous.” Singh’s rising popularity, at least among the NDP, is a sign of a growing desire among the public for more diversity in politics, Tolley said. She added that he’s also viewed as an inspiration to many people, which is reflected in the success he had in getting more people to join the party. Tolley noted that if Singh is voted NDP leader this October, he will be the first federal leader of colour selected by party members in Canada. “Talk about it’s 2017 — given Canada’s history of multiculturalism, how come that hasn’t happened before now?” she said. https://www.thestar.com/news/canada/2017/09/11/heckler-at-ndp-jagmeet-singh-event-demonstrates-why-minorities-are-deterred-from-politics-prof-says.html
TOPIC: East Side Mario's waitress complains about manager's demand that she wear a bra A waitress at East Side Mario's in Timmins, Ont., claims a female manager unfairly demanded she wear a bra at work. "It's a violation of my rights as a person to dictate my undergarments," says Geneviève Loiselle, who started working at the chain restaurant in May. "It was a really sexist thing to do." Loiselle is also upset over how the situation was dealt with. She alleges the manager took her aside before her shift on Sept. 2 and told her she needed to wear a bra as part of her work uniform. "She like literally was looking right at my breasts and said, 'Well, Gen, I can clearly see that you're not wearing a bra and that you have nipple piercings,'" says Loiselle. The 22-year-old describes herself as smaller-chested and finds going braless more comfortable. She believes it's every woman's right to choose if she wants to wear the undergarment. "Some men have larger breasts than I do. You would never impose [a bra] on a male so why would you impose that on a female?" Loiselle claims when she presented this argument to her manager, she was told, "'People don't look at women's bodies the same way they look at men's bodies.'" CBC News asked East Side Mario's owner, Cara International, about Loiselle's allegations and its policy on wearing a bra on the job. "We were recently made aware of this situation and are investigating this matter," the company replied in an email. http://www.cbc.ca/news/business/east-side-mario-s-bra-dress-code-work-1.4277827
Sep 12, 2017, 12:00 PM
Monday September 11 2017 - 9 AM
9:00 AM TOPIC: Chromebook controversy: ‘Every parent should be concerned’ about web-enabled school laptops, parents say GUEST: Nick Manning, Chief Communications Director, WRDSB hen Tabitha Boronka, 13, started high school this week, the public school board handed the Grade 9 student a $330 laptop she can use to explore everything, anywhere. Her mother Irina Boronka is displeased. "They can't just give out unfiltered internet to 13-year-old kids that they can access at any time," she said. "Every parent should be concerned about stuff like pornography, gambling, meeting people there, being exploited, all kinds of inappropriate things that I think they should not have any access to at all." Inside schools, network filters prevent Tabitha and other students from using board-owned computers to access millions of inappropriate sites including pornography, gambling and gaming. Outside schools, Tabitha and others can freely surf the web by connecting their board computers to unfiltered Wi-Fi. This seems wrong to Boronka, a mother of eight who believes the job she shares with the school board is to "lock up the alcohol, lock up the hazardous chemicals, and lock up the Playboy magazines" because children are curious and lack self-control. The Waterloo Region District School Board has given computers called Chromebooks to 10,000 students in a rollout that will eventually provide every high school student with a device. Students carry the computers home and are to keep them all through high school. The devices connect online to Google's web-based education software. The board says this will help build stronger students. Boronka and other parents are demanding the board install technology to restrict website access wherever students take their Chromebooks. Boronka says she got no response after raising her concerns at Waterloo-Oxford District Secondary School, which her daughters attend. "We're aware of other technologies that are available to filter board devices when they're not on our networks and we have looked into those," board spokesperson Nick Manning said. "There are limitations to the technology and it's really not very widespread right now. "We think it's most important that we provide (students) with the education to stay safe online, as opposed to going to big expense and investigating a technology that really as yet is relatively unproven and not very widely adopted to filter at the device level." https://www.therecord.com/news-story/7545451-chromebook-controversy-every-parent-should-be-concerned-about-web-enabled-school-laptops-parents-say/
9:15 AM TOPIC: Binge-watching as a couple is good for your relationship, study says Good news, binge-watchers! We potentially have one more reason for you to feel good about binge-watching TV with your significant other. A new study from the University of Aberdeen concluded that binge-watched shows effectively fills in for time the couple might spend together with mutual friends. If a couple doesn’t have many mutual friends, spending time binge-watching can compensate. Binge-watching a TV show can also bring couples together and make them feel closer. The results of two studies are included in the paper, each of which took place at a Northeastern university. One experiment took 259 students in exclusive relationships for an average of 16.7 months and examined their shared social relationships and their shared media use. They compared those numbers to their assessment of those relationships. The second study had 131 participants (later reduced to 128) in relationships averaging 19.22 months. The couples were asked about the number of friends they shared, had to write about experiences they shared and didn’t share. The study offered the conclusion that binge-watching with your partner was akin to other ways of meeting social needs, such as food, photos, and pets. https://www.dailydot.com/upstream/binge-watching-relationship-benefits-study/
9:30 AM TOPIC: Niagara Wine Festival GUEST: Megan Bates - Lakeview Wine Company
9:45 AM TOPIC: The Thing All Women Do That You Don’t Know About There’s this thing that happens whenever I speak about or write about women’s issues. Things like dress codes, rape culture and sexism. I get the comments: Aren’t there more important things to worry about? Is this really that big of a deal? Aren’t you being overly sensitive? Are you sure you’re being rational about this? Every. Single. Time. And every single time I get frustrated. Why don’t they get it? I think I’ve figured out why. They don’t know. They don’t know about de-escalation. Minimizing. Quietly acquiescing. Hell, even though women live it, we are not always aware of it. But we have all done it. We have all learned, either by instinct or by trial and error, how to minimize a situation that makes us uncomfortable. How to avoid angering a man or endangering ourselves. We have all, on many occasions, ignored an offensive comment. We’ve all laughed off an inappropriate come-on. We’ve all swallowed our anger when being belittled or condescended to. It doesn’t feel good. It feels icky. Dirty. But we do it because to not do it could put us in danger or get us fired or labeled a bitch. So we usually take the path of least precariousness. It’s not something we talk about every day. We don’t tell our boyfriends and husbands and friends every time it happens. Because it is so frequent, so pervasive, that it has become something we just deal with. So maybe they don’t know. http://m.huffpost.com/us/entry/8630416?utm_campaign=hp_fb_pages&utm_source=women_fb&utm_medium=facebook&ncid=fcbklnkushpmg00000046
Sep 11, 2017, 09:13 AM
Friday September 8th, 2017 - 9am
TOPIC: Ontario Liberal bribery trial to hear more from man at centre of allegations GUEST: Allison Jones, Canadian Press A man at the centre of allegations against two Ontario Liberals accused of bribery under the Election Act is set to testify for a second day today. The trial began Thursday in Sudbury, Ont., for Pat Sorbara, the Ontario Liberal Party CEO at the time of the allegations, and Gerry Lougheed, a local Liberal fundraiser. They’re accused of offering would-be candidate Andrew Olivier a job or appointment to get him to step aside for Premier Kathleen Wynne’s preferred candidate in a 2015 byelection in Sudbury. Both have pleaded not guilty. Olivier was the first witness called Thursday and is set to be cross-examined today. That preferred candidate of Wynne’s was Glenn Thibeault — at the time an NDP MP, now the Ontario energy minister — who she ultimately appointed as the candidate and who went on to win the byelection. Court heard Thursday that one of the two charges Sorbara faces relates to an allegation that Thibeault asked for paid jobs on his byelection campaign for two constituency office staffers, and that Sorbara granted that request. Thibeault has previously denied he sought anything that would be seen as a bribe in exchange for running and is not charged with any offences. The premier herself is set to testify on Wednesday. http://www.570news.com/2017/09/08/ontario-liberal-bribery-trial-to-hear-more-from-man-at-centre-of-allegations/
TOPIC: Belfast's New Atheist Mayor Skipped Grace at Dinner and Everyone's Freaking Out Back in June, Nuala McAllister was elected the Lord Mayor of Belfast, Ireland, and Saturday night was her installation dinner. It should’ve been an evening of celebration for the new leader of Belfast — a 28-year-old new mother who sounds absolutely delightful in this profile — but it became controversial when McAllister, an open atheist, didn’t ask anyone to say grace before the food arrived. McAllister didn’t draw attention to this. She didn’t say, “We’re skipping grace. Thank the chefs instead!” She didn’t even comment on it later. She just… had the food served. Yet some people are acting like she just sullied the good name of the entire city. http://www.patheos.com/blogs/friendlyatheist/2017/09/04/belfasts-new-atheist-mayor-skipped-grace-at-dinner-and-everyones-freaking-out/
TOPIC: All things TIFF related GUEST: Hilary Hagerman, Managing Editor, Yahoo Canada Style
TOPIC: B.C. children’s ministry says dad can’t let school-age children ride the bus on their own Adrian Crook took his kids to their first day of school on Tuesday by bus. If he had his way, they would be taking public transit without him. Crook said his eldest four children, ranging in age from seven to 11, started riding the bus from their home in downtown Vancouver to their school in North Vancouver last spring and have not experienced any problems. He said he went to great lengths to teach his kids how to take public transit, easing them into their school commute, which involves taking two buses. “Over the course of two years, we went from one year doing both bus rides with me, to for six months doing just the latter bus ride on their own, to then for just a few months doing the entire trip on their own,” he said. The kids’ trips ended when the Ministry of Children and Family Development (MCFD) got involved after receiving a complaint. “I’m more concerned about the precedent for other parents,” Crook said. “Before my kids used to cross the street to go to 7-Eleven, some of them. Even that’s not allowed anymore.” Three provinces have laws around the age when a child can be left unattended. In Manitoba and New Brunswick, a child cannot be left alone until the age of 12. Ontario’s Child, Youth and Family Services Act states “no person having charge of a child younger than 16 shall leave the child without making provision for the child’s supervision and care that is reasonable in the circumstances.” B.C. has no legal minimum age. A letter from a social worker told Crook that “until the children are 10 years old they cannot be unsupervised in the community, at home, or on transit.” The letter also said, “until a child is 12 years old, responsible, and ideally has taken a babysitter’s course they cannot be responsible for younger children when there is no adult present.” Crook believes attitudes around leaving children on their own have changed drastically over the years due to irrational concerns about safety. “Crime is less than when we grew up so we should be trusting that we live in a safe world,” he said. “But we don’t base our decisions on data, often we base it on a visceral fear.” Crook says he will be riding the bus with his kids until his eldest child turns 12 next summer. http://globalnews.ca/news/3720643/b-c-childrens-ministry-says-dad-cant-let-school-age-children-ride-the-bus-on-their-own/?utm_source=GlobalBC&utm_medium=Facebook
Sep 08, 2017, 12:00 PM
Thursday September 7th, 2017 - 9am
TOPIC: Opioid overdoses killed 38 people in Waterloo region in 2016 GUEST: Michael Parkinson, Waterloo Crime Prevention Council There were 38 deaths from opioid overdoses in 2016 — 24 of which involved fentanyl — recently updated statistics show. The numbers were reported on the Public Health Ontario website that tracks emergency department visits, hospitalizations and deaths due to opioid use. The number is a jump from the 23 people who died from opioid overdoses in 2015 in Waterloo region, 22 in 2014, 22 in 2013 and 25 in 2012. Numbers for the first part of 2017 have not yet been reported. Fentanyl was involved in 24 deaths, followed by a three-way tie between methadone, hydromorphone and morphine, with seven each. Oxycodone, which played a part in 11 deaths in 2012, was involved in four deaths in 2016. When broken down by drug type, the numbers add up to more than 38 because more than one drug may have been found in the person's system. http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/kitchener-waterloo/opioid-overdoses-waterloo-region-2016-fentanyl-1.4277040
TOPIC: Belfast's New Atheist Mayor Skipped Grace at Dinner and Everyone's Freaking Out Back in June, Nuala McAllister was elected the Lord Mayor of Belfast, Ireland, and Saturday night was her installation dinner. It should’ve been an evening of celebration for the new leader of Belfast — a 28-year-old new mother who sounds absolutely delightful in this profile — but it became controversial when McAllister, an open atheist, didn’t ask anyone to say grace before the food arrived. McAllister didn’t draw attention to this. She didn’t say, “We’re skipping grace. Thank the chefs instead!” She didn’t even comment on it later. She just… had the food served. Yet some people are acting like she just sullied the good name of the entire city http://www.patheos.com/blogs/friendlyatheist/2017/09/04/belfasts-new-atheist-mayor-skipped-grace-at-dinner-and-everyones-freaking-out/
TOPIC: Why vaccinations are safe GUEST: Dr. Natasha Crowcroft, Chief of Applied Immunization Research and Evaluation for Public Health Ontario
TOPIC: Barack Obama's post re: immigration Immigration can be a controversial topic. We all want safe, secure borders and a dynamic economy, and people of goodwill can have legitimate disagreements about how to fix our immigration system so that everybody plays by the rules. But that’s not what the action that the White House took today is about. This is about young people who grew up in America – kids who study in our schools, young adults who are starting careers, patriots who pledge allegiance to our flag. These Dreamers are Americans in their hearts, in their minds, in every single way but one: on paper. They were brought to this country by their parents, sometimes even as infants. They may not know a country besides ours. They may not even know a language besides English. They often have no idea they’re undocumented until they apply for a job, or college, or a driver’s license. Over the years, politicians of both parties have worked together to write legislation that would have told these young people – our young people – that if your parents brought you here as a child, if you’ve been here a certain number of years, and if you’re willing to go to college or serve in our military, then you’ll get a chance to stay and earn your citizenship. And for years while I was President, I asked Congress to send me such a bill. That bill never came. And because it made no sense to expel talented, driven, patriotic young people from the only country they know solely because of the actions of their parents, my administration acted to lift the shadow of deportation from these young people, so that they could continue to contribute to our communities and our country. We did so based on the well-established legal principle of prosecutorial discretion, deployed by Democratic and Republican presidents alike, because our immigration enforcement agencies have limited resources, and it makes sense to focus those resources on those who come illegally to this country to do us harm. Deportations of criminals went up. Some 800,000 young people stepped forward, met rigorous requirements, and went through background checks. And America grew stronger as a result. But today, that shadow has been cast over some of our best and brightest young people once again. To target these young people is wrong – because they have done nothing wrong. It is self-defeating – because they want to start new businesses, staff our labs, serve in our military, and otherwise contribute to the country we love. And it is cruel. What if our kid’s science teacher, or our friendly neighbor turns out to be a Dreamer? Where are we supposed to send her? To a country she doesn’t know or remember, with a language she may not even speak? Let’s be clear: the action taken today isn’t required legally. It’s a political decision, and a moral question. Whatever concerns or complaints Americans may have about immigration in general, we shouldn’t threaten the future of this group of young people who are here through no fault of their own, who pose no threat, who are not taking away anything from the rest of us. They are that pitcher on our kid’s softball team, that first responder who helps out his community after a disaster, that cadet in ROTC who wants nothing more than to wear the uniform of the country that gave him a chance. Kicking them out won’t lower the unemployment rate, or lighten anyone’s taxes, or raise anybody’s wages. It is precisely because this action is contrary to our spirit, and to common sense, that business leaders, faith leaders, economists, and Americans of all political stripes called on the administration not to do what it did today. And now that the White House has shifted its responsibility for these young people to Congress, it’s up to Members of Congress to protect these young people and our future. I’m heartened by those who’ve suggested that they should. And I join my voice with the majority of Americans who hope they step up and do it with a sense of moral urgency that matches the urgency these young people feel. Ultimately, this is about basic decency. This is about whether we are a people who kick hopeful young strivers out of America, or whether we treat them the way we’d want our own kids to be treated. It’s about who we are as a people – and who we want to be. What makes us American is not a question of what we look like, or where our names come from, or the way we pray. What makes us American is our fidelity to a set of ideals – that all of us are created equal; that all of us deserve the chance to make of our lives what we will; that all of us share an obligation to stand up, speak out, and secure our most cherished values for the next generation. That’s how America has traveled this far. That’s how, if we keep at it, we will ultimately reach that more perfect union. https://www.facebook.com/barackobama/posts/10155227588436749
Sep 07, 2017, 12:00 PM
Wednesday September 6th, 2017 - 9am
TOPIC: Darshan Kang and the arithmetic of sexual assault GUEST: Anne Kingston, MacLeans Last Thursday, we were provided with an instructive glimpse into the arithmetic of sexual violence when Liberal MP Darshan Kang resigned from caucus. Kang stepped down 21 days after the Hill Times revealed on Aug. 11  that the Calgary Skyview MP was under House of Commons investigation for sexual harassment; an unnamed female staffer at his constituency office had registered a complaint. Even a damning allegation made two days previously that the MP attempted to buy the woman’s silence, a claim Kang denied, didn’t change his caucus status (the rookie MP went on “medical leave” earlier in the week for “stress”). Tuesday, the day of the pay-out allegation, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau refused to  comment on the charges for the second straight day; he told reporters that the complaint would be handled through a recently created independent process for resolving “misconduct complaints” and that he’ll let the process “unfold as it should.” Sheila Malcolmson, NDP critic for the status of women, vented her frustration: “This is not the leadership of a feminist prime minister,” she said in a statement. “Until such time as a full investigation can be completed Mr. Kang should not sit as a member of the governing party.” Circumstances reversed suddenly on Thursday after a second woman who’d worked in Kang’s constituency office when he was a MLA in the Alberta legislature came forward. Kirstin Morrell, who worked for Kang between 2011-12, accused the MP of repeatedly groping and kissing her against her will;  he had a “problem with consent,” she said. Kang, who denied the allegations, resigned hours later. http://www.macleans.ca/news/darshan-kang-and-the-arithmetic-of-sexual-assault/
TOPIC: French magazine fined for publishing topless photos of Kate A French court has given maximum fines but awarded limited damages in the case of topless photos of Kate, the Duchess of Cambridge, that outraged Britain's Royal Family. The court in a Paris suburb ruled Tuesday that three photographers and three newspaper executives invaded the privacy of the former Kate Middleton by taking and publishing the photos. Two executives of a French gossip magazine and two photographers working with a photo agency were collectively ordered to pay the equivalent of $73,580 Cdn in damages to Kate and the same amount to her husband, Prince William. The amount is well below the $2.2 million in damages that were reportedly sought by the royal couple. http://www.cbc.ca/news/world/french-magazine-court-kate-photos-1.4275208
TOPIC: Family loses fight for autistic son to have service dog in class GUEST: Craig Fee, Father of Kenner Fee Ontario’s human rights tribunal has ruled that a nine-year-old autistic boy can’t bring his service dog with him into class. The decision says Kenner Fee’s family failed to prove that having his black Labrador Ivy in the classroom would help him with his education. Adjudicator and tribunal vice-chair Laurie Letheren found that the Waterloo Catholic District School Board took all necessary steps to evaluate whether the dog was needed in the classroom, and supported the board’s decision not to allow the service animal to sit beside Kenner during lessons. The tribunal heard from Kenner’s family that his autism leaves him prone to agitation, emotional outbursts and even bolting from his surroundings, but that having Ivy beside him significantly helps regulate his behaviour. Letheren accepted that evidence, but also accepted testimony from school board staff suggesting Kenner was performing well in class without Ivy, and that any problems he was encountering would not necessarily be addressed by the dog’s presence.Fee’s lawyer Laura McKeen says the family is crushed by the decision and is considering their next steps, including Kenner’s future education plans. She says the Fees have the right to appeal the ruling, but have not yet decided if they will do so. “They truly believe that Kenner’s service animal Ivy is essential to his entire life, including and specifically his education,” she said. “The Fees are devastated by the impact that decision is going to have on Kenner going forward.” The Waterloo Catholic District School Board did not comment specifically on the decision other than to acknowledge the outcome in their favour. “We work alongside families to make student-centred, individualized decisions that we collectively believe will allow them to flourish,” Director of Education Loretta Notten said in a statement. “Student success is of paramount importance to us and we strive to bring each one to their fullest potential.” The Aug. 30 tribunal decision chronicles a fight Kenner’s family began in April 2014 to get Ivy into the boy’s class, something that has not been allowed to date. The tribunal heard that Kenner had been matched with Ivy after training with the Lions Foundation of Canada Dog Guides, an internationally accredited school that provides service dogs to address a range of disabilities. Kenner’s father, Craig Fee, told the tribunal that Ivy’s presence had made a noticeable difference in Kenner’s life and helped regulate his behaviour. When he sought permission to bring Ivy into Kenner’s classroom, however, the request was denied. Board employees told the tribunal there were concerns that Ivy would set Kenner back in his independence, adding that he may rely too much on the dog rather than working directly with staff and peers. Kenner’s father and various professionals working with Kenner told the tribunal the boy’s anxiety got worse the longer he went without his service animal during school days. The decision said that assertion was not supported by testimony from board staff, who said Kenner was largely compliant with instructions and generally functioning fairly well academically. Behaviour tracking sheets submitted to the tribunal noted instances when Kenner allegedly tried to leave the school yard and even climb out a window, but a special education teacher downplayed the incidents in his testimony. He said in both cases Kenner threatened to go through with an escape, but stopped upon being prompted by a teacher. The teacher also denied an incident noted in a behaviour tracking sheet indicating Kenner threw a chair, saying the student had never intentionally done anything to endanger himself or others. The teacher testified that Kenner was not visibly upset in class, though he did tell the tribunal that Kenner would sometimes yell out for Ivy. Letheren said that while having Ivy there would eliminate that issue, she said the dog “could not provide indicators about why the applicant may be feeling so stressed at school.” Letheren also went on to note that Kenner is prone to “exaggerating his situation” according to testimony from both his father and a teacher. Letheren said the board had taken appropriate steps to put learning supports in place for Kenner and that Ivy’s presence was not necessary. “I find that the evidence demonstrates that the supports and strategies that the respondent has provided to accommodate his disability related needs are providing him the opportunity to realize (his) potential and develop into (a) highly skilled, knowledgeable, caring citizen who contribute[s] to [his] society,” she wrote. The ruling was met with shock and dismay by some members of the autism community. Laura Kirby-McIntosh, Vice-President of the Ontario Autism Coalition, said the decision represents a setback for education in the province since school boards can apply provincial accessibility guidelines according to their own discretion. “The injustice here is that whether or not service dogs enter a school is going to be completely left to the discretion of 72 different individual school boards. To me, your rights should not change depending on your postal code.” Currently, Ontario’s education act does not treat schools as spaces that are open to the public, which is what permits boards to bar service animals from the premises if they wish. Kirby-McIntosh said there’s a pressing need for a province-wide education standard on all accessibility issues, including service animal access. http://www.570news.com/2017/08/31/family-loses-fight-autistic-son-service-dog-class/
TOPIC: Barack Obama's post yesterday re: immigration Immigration can be a controversial topic. We all want safe, secure borders and a dynamic economy, and people of goodwill can have legitimate disagreements about how to fix our immigration system so that everybody plays by the rules. But that’s not what the action that the White House took today is about. This is about young people who grew up in America – kids who study in our schools, young adults who are starting careers, patriots who pledge allegiance to our flag. These Dreamers are Americans in their hearts, in their minds, in every single way but one: on paper. They were brought to this country by their parents, sometimes even as infants. They may not know a country besides ours. They may not even know a language besides English. They often have no idea they’re undocumented until they apply for a job, or college, or a driver’s license. Over the years, politicians of both parties have worked together to write legislation that would have told these young people – our young people – that if your parents brought you here as a child, if you’ve been here a certain number of years, and if you’re willing to go to college or serve in our military, then you’ll get a chance to stay and earn your citizenship. And for years while I was President, I asked Congress to send me such a bill. That bill never came. And because it made no sense to expel talented, driven, patriotic young people from the only country they know solely because of the actions of their parents, my administration acted to lift the shadow of deportation from these young people, so that they could continue to contribute to our communities and our country. We did so based on the well-established legal principle of prosecutorial discretion, deployed by Democratic and Republican presidents alike, because our immigration enforcement agencies have limited resources, and it makes sense to focus those resources on those who come illegally to this country to do us harm. Deportations of criminals went up. Some 800,000 young people stepped forward, met rigorous requirements, and went through background checks. And America grew stronger as a result. But today, that shadow has been cast over some of our best and brightest young people once again. To target these young people is wrong – because they have done nothing wrong. It is self-defeating – because they want to start new businesses, staff our labs, serve in our military, and otherwise contribute to the country we love. And it is cruel. What if our kid’s science teacher, or our friendly neighbor turns out to be a Dreamer? Where are we supposed to send her? To a country she doesn’t know or remember, with a language she may not even speak? Let’s be clear: the action taken today isn’t required legally. It’s a political decision, and a moral question. Whatever concerns or complaints Americans may have about immigration in general, we shouldn’t threaten the future of this group of young people who are here through no fault of their own, who pose no threat, who are not taking away anything from the rest of us. They are that pitcher on our kid’s softball team, that first responder who helps out his community after a disaster, that cadet in ROTC who wants nothing more than to wear the uniform of the country that gave him a chance. Kicking them out won’t lower the unemployment rate, or lighten anyone’s taxes, or raise anybody’s wages. It is precisely because this action is contrary to our spirit, and to common sense, that business leaders, faith leaders, economists, and Americans of all political stripes called on the administration not to do what it did today. And now that the White House has shifted its responsibility for these young people to Congress, it’s up to Members of Congress to protect these young people and our future. I’m heartened by those who’ve suggested that they should. And I join my voice with the majority of Americans who hope they step up and do it with a sense of moral urgency that matches the urgency these young people feel. Ultimately, this is about basic decency. This is about whether we are a people who kick hopeful young strivers out of America, or whether we treat them the way we’d want our own kids to be treated. It’s about who we are as a people – and who we want to be. What makes us American is not a question of what we look like, or where our names come from, or the way we pray. What makes us American is our fidelity to a set of ideals – that all of us are created equal; that all of us deserve the chance to make of our lives what we will; that all of us share an obligation to stand up, speak out, and secure our most cherished values for the next generation. That’s how America has traveled this far. That’s how, if we keep at it, we will ultimately reach that more perfect union. https://www.facebook.com/barackobama/posts/10155227588436749
Sep 06, 2017, 12:00 PM
Tuesday September 5 2017 - 9 AM
9:00 AM TOPIC: Why some parents are scared of vaccines GUEST: Sydney Loney, Today's Parent If you’ve ever held a flailing infant down while a doctor pushed a vaccine-loaded syringe into her soft, unblemished baby skin, you might recall feeling stressed, anxious or even afraid. Maybe you took comfort in the thought that it was for her own good. Maybe the fact that your doctor told you that she had to be vaccinated was enough reassurance. Or, maybe you’re part of the 15 to 20 percent of parents who have some serious doubts about immunization. Trust is a fragile thing—hard to earn and easily broken. Lately, it seems more tenuous than ever. From fake news to government computer hacking, the events of the past year have done little to repair our eroding trust in the institutions designed to protect us. This is especially true when it comes to science. Last September, researchers at the Ontario Science Centre found that one in five Canadians trusts their intuition over science when it comes to forming opinions about things like GMOs. A 2015 Angus Reid poll of more than 1,500 Canadians revealed that 40 percent question the science behind vaccines. http://www.macleans.ca/society/health/why-some-parents-are-scared-of-vaccines/
9:15 AM TOPIC: Belfast’s New Atheist Mayor Skipped Grace at Dinner and Everyone’s Freaking Out Back in June, Nuala McAllister was elected the Lord Mayor of Belfast, Ireland, and Saturday night was her installation dinner. It should’ve been an evening of celebration for the new leader of Belfast — a 28-year-old new mother who sounds absolutely delightful in this profile — but it became controversial when McAllister, an open atheist, didn’t ask anyone to say grace before the food arrived. McAllister didn’t draw attention to this. She didn’t say, “We’re skipping grace. Thank the chefs instead!” She didn’t even comment on it later. She just… had the food served. Yet some people are acting like she just sullied the good name of the entire city. http://www.patheos.com/blogs/friendlyatheist/2017/09/04/belfasts-new-atheist-mayor-skipped-grace-at-dinner-and-everyones-freaking-out/
9:30 AM TOPIC: Miss Oktoberfest 2017 will be crowned at the end of the month GUEST: Vanessa Buttinger, Miss Oktoberfest 2016 http://misso.oktoberfest.ca/become-miss-o/
Sep 05, 2017, 08:49 AM
Friday September 1st, 2017 - 9am
9:00 AM TOPIC: Urgent call for volunteer drivers to help local seniors GUEST: Rosalind Horne, Director of Engagement and Responsiveness, Community Support Connections, Meals on Wheels and More Community Support Connections – Meals on Wheels and More (CSC) is facing a shortage of volunteer drivers to help local seniors get to medical appointments, the grocery store or visit their lifelong partner in long-term care. Transportation is CSC’s fastest growing program and demand continues to rise as a result of an aging population. In 2008-09, CSC provided 9,600 client rides skyrocketing to 41,372 rides in 2016-17 – a 330% increase. Though the agency is doing everything they can to meet growing demand, around 100 ride requests are unmet each month due to a lack of volunteers. Over the summer alone, they had to turn down more than 300 requests.
9:15 AM TOPIC: Family loses fight for autistic son to have service dog in class Ontario’s human rights tribunal has ruled that a nine-year-old autistic boy can’t bring his service dog with him into class. The decision says Kenner Fee’s family failed to prove that having his black Labrador Ivy in the classroom would help him with his education. Adjudicator and tribunal vice-chair Laurie Letheren found that the Waterloo Catholic District School Board took all necessary steps to evaluate whether the dog was needed in the classroom, and supported the board’s decision not to allow the service animal to sit beside Kenner during lessons. The tribunal heard from Kenner’s family that his autism leaves him prone to agitation, emotional outbursts and even bolting from his surroundings, but that having Ivy beside him significantly helps regulate his behaviour. Letheren accepted that evidence, but also accepted testimony from school board staff suggesting Kenner was performing well in class without Ivy, and that any problems he was encountering would not necessarily be addressed by the dog’s presence.Fee’s lawyer Laura McKeen says the family is crushed by the decision and is considering their next steps, including Kenner’s future education plans. She says the Fees have the right to appeal the ruling, but have not yet decided if they will do so. “They truly believe that Kenner’s service animal Ivy is essential to his entire life, including and specifically his education,” she said. “The Fees are devastated by the impact that decision is going to have on Kenner going forward.” The Waterloo Catholic District School Board did not comment specifically on the decision other than to acknowledge the outcome in their favour. “We work alongside families to make student-centred, individualized decisions that we collectively believe will allow them to flourish,” Director of Education Loretta Notten said in a statement. “Student success is of paramount importance to us and we strive to bring each one to their fullest potential.” The Aug. 30 tribunal decision chronicles a fight Kenner’s family began in April 2014 to get Ivy into the boy’s class, something that has not been allowed to date. The tribunal heard that Kenner had been matched with Ivy after training with the Lions Foundation of Canada Dog Guides, an internationally accredited school that provides service dogs to address a range of disabilities. Kenner’s father, Craig Fee, told the tribunal that Ivy’s presence had made a noticeable difference in Kenner’s life and helped regulate his behaviour. When he sought permission to bring Ivy into Kenner’s classroom, however, the request was denied. Board employees told the tribunal there were concerns that Ivy would set Kenner back in his independence, adding that he may rely too much on the dog rather than working directly with staff and peers. Kenner’s father and various professionals working with Kenner told the tribunal the boy’s anxiety got worse the longer he went without his service animal during school days. The decision said that assertion was not supported by testimony from board staff, who said Kenner was largely compliant with instructions and generally functioning fairly well academically. Behaviour tracking sheets submitted to the tribunal noted instances when Kenner allegedly tried to leave the school yard and even climb out a window, but a special education teacher downplayed the incidents in his testimony. He said in both cases Kenner threatened to go through with an escape, but stopped upon being prompted by a teacher. The teacher also denied an incident noted in a behaviour tracking sheet indicating Kenner threw a chair, saying the student had never intentionally done anything to endanger himself or others. The teacher testified that Kenner was not visibly upset in class, though he did tell the tribunal that Kenner would sometimes yell out for Ivy. Letheren said that while having Ivy there would eliminate that issue, she said the dog “could not provide indicators about why the applicant may be feeling so stressed at school.” Letheren also went on to note that Kenner is prone to “exaggerating his situation” according to testimony from both his father and a teacher. Letheren said the board had taken appropriate steps to put learning supports in place for Kenner and that Ivy’s presence was not necessary. “I find that the evidence demonstrates that the supports and strategies that the respondent has provided to accommodate his disability related needs are providing him the opportunity to realize (his) potential and develop into (a) highly skilled, knowledgeable, caring citizen who contribute[s] to [his] society,” she wrote. The ruling was met with shock and dismay by some members of the autism community. Laura Kirby-McIntosh, Vice-President of the Ontario Autism Coalition, said the decision represents a setback for education in the province since school boards can apply provincial accessibility guidelines according to their own discretion. “The injustice here is that whether or not service dogs enter a school is going to be completely left to the discretion of 72 different individual school boards. To me, your rights should not change depending on your postal code.” Currently, Ontario’s education act does not treat schools as spaces that are open to the public, which is what permits boards to bar service animals from the premises if they wish. Kirby-McIntosh said there’s a pressing need for a province-wide education standard on all accessibility issues, including service animal access. http://www.570news.com/2017/08/31/family-loses-fight-autistic-son-service-dog-class/
9:30 AM TOPIC: Distracted driving, Long weekend safety driving, kids going back to school GUEST: Lauren Ball, Provincial Constable, OPP Expect to see lots of officers out on roadways this long weekend as OPP are conducting a distracted driving campaign. Provincial Police will be out in full force, as they say distracted driving has now caused more crashes than speeding and alcohol and drugs combined. So far this year, 47 people have lost their lives due to inattentive driving. That’s up from 39 in 2016. http://www.570news.com/2017/09/01/opp-cracking-distracted-driving-labour-day-long-weekend/
9:45 AM TOPIC: Kids of Divorce Less Stressed When Custody Is Shared When courts get involved in child custody cases, kids end up in the full custody of their moms 80% of the time. New research suggests the thinking behind this trend—that conflict between parents is so harmful to kids they should avoid shared custody—is all wrong. In fact, a team out of Sweden reports in the Journal of Divorce & Remarriage that kids have a harder time missing one of their parents than they do coping with their parents not getting along. "If you want to hasten the process of healing, or at least tolerance, the worst thing you can do is declare one person a winner and one person a loser," one expert tells the Minneapolis Star Tribune. "You're both winners. You're both going to be parents. That will actually diminish conflict." To test this, researchers analyzed data on more than 800 children in Sweden's Surveys of Living Conditions. Kids who live with just one of their parents are more likely to experience stress multiple times a week than kids in joint custody, they report in a press release. "There has previously been a concern that shared physical custody could be an unstable living situation that can lead to children becoming more stressed," says researcher Jani Turunen. But, per the press release, he contends those concerns are built "on theoretical assumptions rather than empirical research." Shared custody allows children to maintain active relationships with both parents, gives them more resources that each parent has separate access to, and takes away worry over the parent they rarely see. (Brad Pitt has "therapeutic visits," not custody.) http://www.newser.com/story/247954/kids-do-better-under-shared-not-sole-custody.html
Sep 01, 2017, 12:00 PM
Thursday August 31 2017 - 9 AM
9:00 AM TOPIC: Women award winners work toward goals because they believe in them GUEST: Donna Reid, Ward 1 Councillor, City of Cambridge I wanted to talk to you about the Oktoberfest Women of the Year award. Many times it was stated that these award winners are so self-deprecating and humble. As a feminist I am uncomfortable with this being held up as a value we should aspire to be. They should be proud of their accomplishments and eager to say so. Women award winners work toward goals because they believe in them not for the award. However, we do want to be recognized for our successes. I have always told my bosses I work well with praise. I am not unique in this. We all need praise and reward for work well done. I am also an Oktoberfest award winner for advocacy. Thanks for listening.”
9:15 AM TOPIC: Quit Doing These 8 Things for Your Teen This Year if You Want to Raise an Adult http://alfastories.net/quit-doing-these-8-things-for-your-teen-this-year-if-you-want-to-raise-an-adult/
9:30 AM TOPIC: 20th anniversary of the death of Princess Diana GUEST: Bradley Barbour, Moncarchist League of Canada, Waterloo-Wellington chapter With the 20th anniversary of Princess Diana’s death approaching Thursday, she has returned to our cultural imagination. The late Princess of Wales has been gracing magazine covers as a style icon again. There is the new novel, “Imagining Diana,” which speculates what her life might have looked like if she had survived the car accident that killed her. And then there are the many new documentaries about her, including one where her sons, Prince William and Prince Harry, speak about losing their mother for the first time. Diana died at 36 in a paparazzi-fuelled car crash in Paris on Aug. 31, 1997. Her death left people the world over devastated. In Toronto, the Princess of Wales Theatre became an impromptu shrine, Casey House, an AIDS hospice Diana visited, saw people line up for days to sign a book of condolences and the St. James Cathedral rang out half-muffled bells to mark her passing. In Ottawa and Vancouver, people left flowers outside the British High Commission, Rideau Hall and the British consulate. Now, Canadians are sharing memories of the “People’s Princess” again. Royal historian Carolyn Harris says Diana — who would hug hospital patients, crouch down to children or people in wheelchairs and pick up something if someone dropped it — combined glamour and vulnerability. “She gave the monarchy a great deal of star quality,” Harris says. “At the same time, she was fairly open about the difficulties that she faced and willing to open up to others.” It’s why people of various backgrounds around the world identified with Diana in many ways, she notes. “They felt like they knew her,” Harris says. Some Canadians still feel that way. Skye Morrison, a founding member of the Textile Museum of Canada in Toronto, only met Diana for about half an hour during her visit to Canada in 1991 — when she signed the famous Canadian AIDS quilt on display — but recalls that she carried herself like she was having a private conversation with friends. “She was quite relaxed…not flashy,” Morrison says. “She was quiet, reserved and thoughtful.” Among some 45 people present at the museum that day were family members and friends who had lost a loved one to AIDS. When stopping at the quilt to ask questions, Diana listened to their stories with purpose, Morrison says. “(Diana) was gracious … and engaged,” she says. “She looks at you in the eye.” Diana also visited Casey House that year. Inside, she shook hands with one of the residents, a moment that was captured in an iconic photo that helped reduce stigma and fear of those with AIDS, says Erika Epprecht, a registered nurse who has been at Casey House since it was founded in 1988. “It had a really big impact on the (residents),” she says. “There was just such a strong stigma, and then to be so recognized by a person of such global importance went a long way to educating the world that you did not have to be that afraid.” Epprecht wasn’t scheduled to work that day, but she came in — dressed in a black suit and her best earrings — just to meet Diana, as did many of the other nurses. She says Diana came across as “calm and caring” when she stopped by the nursing station to chat and take a photo with them. “She has a way of making people feel connected with her,” Epprecht says. “She did her job so well.” When Diana entered Casey House’s reception area, which was a living room, someone had moved the chair that had been put out for her. Jane Darville, then executive director of Casey House, watched Diana sit on a radiator to talk at eye level with a resident in a wheelchair. “She was sweet,” Darville says. “You didn’t feel like you were talking to a princess.” She noted that Diana stayed longer than planned and spent time with all 13 residents. “She asked about (the residents’) families or partners,” Darville says. “She was casual…and kind.” It was the same at a cancer treatment centre in Sudbury, Ont., which Diana also visited in 1991, according to Audrey Oliver, a registered nurse who is now retired. “She was interested in each (patient’s) struggle with cancer,” says Oliver. “She made the (patients) feel so special.” Even people who had never met Diana loved her. Robert Finch, chairman of the Monarchist League of Canada, views Diana as both a loving mother and a great, compassionate and caring person. “She had that caring personal touch that a lot of people look up to,” he says. When Diana died, 19-year-old Finch lined up with his family at Hamilton City Hall to sign a book of condolences. What struck him was how quiet and sombre the crowd was. “Nobody talked. It was an almost eerie feeling,” Finch says. “It was as if you were going through a funeral.” What has also stayed with him all these years is Diana’s funeral itself, which was watched by some 2.5 billion TV viewers, particularly the scene of Prince William and Prince Harry walking behind their mother’s casket through the streets of London. “Her greatest legacy perhaps (is) her boys: how they conduct themselves and take their roles very seriously,” he says. At the same time, Finch believes Diana helped transform the monarchy as an institution, noting the royal family has a softer touch and more relaxed attitude these days. Case in point: Prince Charles introduced the Queen as “Mummy” instead of “Her Majesty” during the Queen’s 2012 Diamond Jubilee. “It’s the little things that add up and make people realize that it’s not all about protocol and officialdom,” Finch says. “They have to live their lives and have a bit of fun.” http://www.570news.com/2017/08/30/canadians-reflect-on-princess-diana-with-20th-anniversary-of-her-death-nearing/
9:45 AM TOPIC: Where were you for world events when they happened?
Aug 31, 2017, 01:00 PM
Wednesday August 30 2017 - 9 AM
9:00 AM TOPIC: "What a crowd, what a turnout!" Trump visited Texas and forgot to mention Hurricane Harvey’s victims Donald Trump arrived in Texas, gave a briefing at a fire station, and told Texans, “This is a really special place and a special state.” So far, so relatively normal. Straight afterwards, however, several hundred Trump supporters arrived and the US president proceeded to give them a speech that seemed curiously indifferent to the plight of the tens of thousands of people made homeless by Hurricane Harvey, which has caused record-breaking rain and catastrophic flooding. Presidential events are often reported on by one journalist picked from among the White House correspondents, whose “pool report” is then shared among the rest of the press corps. Normally, language in pool reports is brisk, factual, and dispassionate. For this one the pool reporter happened to be from a Texas paper, the Dallas Morning News, and what they heard was apparently enough to prompt a remarkable shift from normal pool custom. https://qz.com/1065191/hurricane-harvey-trump-did-a-mini-campaign-rally-in-houston-and-failed-to-express-sympathy-for-flood-victims/
9:15 AM TOPIC: Before you hit the send button, ask yourself: What would my employer think? It might save your job GUEST: Howard A. Levitt, Senior Partner LEVITT LLP Even the best legal argument is only as strong as its weakest link. An employee suing for wrongful dismissal may have a stellar employment record. That is, until the employer discovers her penchant for circulating disparaging emails about her employer. As I frequently tell my employer clients: It takes only one good ground to terminate an employee for cause; you just need to secure it. In 2017, that ground is often found in an email. Often some innocuous, apparently innocent correspondence sent to a colleague can lead to an employee’s undoing. http://business.financialpost.com/executive/careers/before-you-hit-the-send-button-ask-yourself-what-would-my-employer-think-it-might-save-your-job
9:30 AM TOPIC: Oktoberfest women of the year awards GUEST: Margo Jones, President of Oktoberfest
9:45 AM TOPIC: Things you should never do at a restaurant If you’re trying to impress someone - be they a date, client or in-law - you might want to reassess your table manners. According to a new study, 60 per cent of people have been put off by their dining partner’s restaurant etiquette. The top no-nos? Clicking your fingers to get a waiter’s attention, speaking with your mouth full and being too loud and raucous. According to the poll of 1,500 adults by software partner to the hospitality industry Fourth, 11 per cent of Brits have been embarrassed by their partner’s behaviour in a restaurant, and 10 per cent have felt the need to apologise about their parents’ manners. But the study revealed that many of us have committed embarrassing faux-pas in restaurants - five per cent of people have complained to a waiter because their red wine was warm and the same number have mistakenly thought a finger bowl was clear soup. http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/food-and-drink/restaurant-never-do-dining-clicking-fingers-talking-loud-mouth-full-phone-a7911721.html
Aug 30, 2017, 09:40 AM