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Some reaction to the NDP's decision to proceed with the Site C dam in B.C.

Last Updated Dec 11, 2017 at 6:00 pm EDT

Here is some of the reaction to the NDP government’s decision to go ahead with the Site C hydroelectric dam in British Columbia:

“Today is a dark day. The government has passed up its chance to stop this misbegotten project. Instead, it has betrayed First Nations and all those who voted in hope of stopping Site C.” — Peace Valley campaigner Galen Armstrong of the Sierra Club in B.C.

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“In the long-run, Site C’s affordable energy is a huge competitive advantage for business in the province. B.C.’s hydroelectric system gives businesses and residents certainty that reliable and clean power will be available when it is needed.” — Val Litwin, president and CEO of the B.C. Chamber of Commerce.

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“Affirming the construction of Site C is the right decision for the future of our province. Assuring a domestic source of clean, reliable hydroelectric power helps secure our energy system for the growth of businesses and sectors of the Lower Mainland and provincial economy for decades into the future.” — Iain Black, president and CEO of the Greater Vancouver Board of Trade.

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“Since the 1970s when it was first proposed, the Site C dam has caused nothing but worry and heartbreak for the farm families and First Nations living in the Peace River Valley. With the election of the NDP government, there came reason to hope. But now the looming threat of a dam flooding them out is back – what a lost opportunity.” — National campaign director Joe Foy of the Wilderness Committee.

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“With so much at stake for our province, better late than never for John Horgan and the NDP government to support Site C. This entire process and all of the uncertainty it caused was completely unnecessary. In the past four months, we have seen a rushed review and needless NDP-Green politicking create uncertainty and confusion that put this clean energy project, and the thousands of jobs it supports, at risk for no reason.” — Chris Gardner, president of the Independent Contractors and Businesses Association.

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“It was John Horgan’s NDP that demanded a Site C inquiry by the B.C. Utilities Commission, and the results they received from it were clear: no need for the power, better alternatives once we do, and no advantage to ratepayers to proceed. With those findings, the only responsible choice was to immediately stop destroying the Peace River Valley. — Chief Roland Willson of the West Moberly First Nations.

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“We recognize this has been a difficult decision for the newly elected NDP government. We respect and appreciate the many contributions from all sides of this issue because this was certainly not an easy choice. That said, completing the Site C dam remains the best choice for British Columbian families.” — Tom Sigurdson, executive director of the B.C. Building Trades.

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“I am confident that First Nations will continue their efforts to stop Site C and the next step will be legal challenges. We have rights in our traditional territories and, just as important, we have responsibilities to those traditional territories — to protect them, maintain them and sustain them. If this project proceeds it will devastate traditional territories and sacred sites.” — National Chief Perry Bellegarde of the Assembly of First Nations.

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“Taking a four billion-dollar bath with nothing to show for it would have been fiscally irresponsible.” — Kris Sims, B.C. director of the Canadian Taxpayers Federation.

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“The Province has already broken its treaty promises to us, and that’s why we are going to trial in March.”

“Premier Horgan could have done the right thing here and taken a step toward reconciliation, but he chose not to. Site C will be the single largest infringement of our rights under Treaty 8, and there is no justification for it.” — Blueberry River Chief Marvin Yahey.